Glossary and Definitions

There is always something new to learn and as our volunteers hear questions about certain terms they will put information here to assist our visitors.

Baygall or Bay Head

A baygall is a thick, forested depression at the base of a sandy slope. Water seepage from higher elevations allows moisture to accumulate in the soil. When this occurs over a long time, a substrate called peat forms. The Arboretum baygalls do not yet have a peat layer.

Borrow Pit

A pit created to provide earth that can be used as fill at another site.

QR code

You may see these modern “bar codes” around the park. They can be used by some cell phones and mobile devices to obtain information about the park either using a standard QR app or the application available from Cynaria.
Here’s what google’s look like:

Xeric Hammock

The Live Oak and Rosemary Ridge Trails wind their way through xeric hammock. This habitat covers approximately 30 percent of the Arboretum and was likely much smaller a century ago when fire and fire-tolerant pine habitats, such as scrubby flatwoods and sandhills, were more prevalent in this area. Xeric Hammock only develops in areas that have been protected from fire for at least 30 years. As you walk along the trails through Xeric Hammock, you will find a thriving community of plants in the canopy, mid-story, and understory. This community grows in well-drained, sandy soils. Little water and nutrients are retained in the sandy soil, resulting an abundance of palmettos, low-growing oaks and drought-resistant shrubs. The canopy is dominated by stunted laurel (Quercus laurifolia) and live (Quercus virginiana) oaks and an occasional chapman’s oak (Quercus chapmanii). The mid- and understory layers are dominated by palmettos and shrubs in the blueberry family such as sparkleberry (Vaccinium arboretum), rusty lyonia (Lyonia ferruginea), and fetterbush (Lyonia lucida).

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